Imagine A More Connected Edmonton

We are richer as a city when all citizens are able to meaningfully take part in the community. Edmonton’s seniors have much to offer through their experiences and perspectives, and they deserve to be included and supported as they navigate the significant transitions that come with aging. By working together, we can support the social inclusion of seniors.

Find out how!

Our Bold Vision

Every senior has strong social connections

that support their health and wellness.

We all benefit when seniors are valued, respected, and supported to live healthily in their own homes and communities. Inclusion and social connectedness are key to good health. People of all ages with robust networks of social and community support have better physical and mental health outcomes, while isolation and loneliness put health at risk. Let’s work together to make sure all Edmontonians, regardless of age, feel respected and included.

The Facts

In our survey of 720 Edmonton adults 55 years of age and older, results showed:

1 in 4 want to be more active in their communities or every day life, but they do not want to go alone

1 in 4 (25%)

don’t have someone they can count on to listen to them

2 in 5 seldom or never have someone they can count on

Nearly 2 in 5 (39%)

seldom or never have someone they can count on

1 in 4 want to be more active in their communities or every day life, but they do not want to go alone

Nearly 1 in 4 (24%)

seldom or never have someone they can rely on for help when they need it

Data Source: PEGASIS Population Survey of 720 adults aged 55+, February 2019, conducted by InsightsWest.

“Social isolation is one of the most devastating things you can do to a human being; it doesn’t matter how old you are.”

– Rosalind Wiseman

Social isolation and loneliness are important social, health and quality of life issues. Seniors are especially at risk of being socially isolated or lonely because of a combination of factors such as life transitions, health challenges, and smaller social networks.

If you think you may be at risk, or someone you know may be at risk, learn to identify the signs of social isolation.

Social isolation is in part a reflection of the society we live in. It doesn’t necessarily happen by choice, and it’s not always easy to recognize or change. We used to assume that losing our social networks and becoming socially isolated were part of growing older. Now we know that social supports and safe, healthy environments can foster older adults’ participating in their communities.